Windows 10 1803 has a bug that appears if you use a roaming profile. The roaming profile doesn’t sync and it takes a considerable amount of time to log in and log out. If you’re experiencing this bug, you’ve likely seen the error message “Roaming Profile Was Not Completely Synchronized”. Microsoft is aware of the issue and there’s a fix for it. It requires you edit the Windows registry but this isn’t as simple as creating a new key or value. You need access to another Windows 10 system running 1803. Here’s how you can fix the “Roaming Profile Was Not Completely Synchronized” bug.

Roaming Profile Was Not Completely Synchronized

If you have access to a Windows 10 system running build 1803, you need to open the Windows Registry on that system and go to the following location.

HComputerHKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionWinlogon

Select the ExcludeProfileDirs value, and go to FileExport. Save the value to an easily accessible location, and then move it to the Windows 10 system where you get the Roaming Profile Was Not Completely Synchronized error. Right-click it, and select Merge from the context menu. You will need administrative rights to modify the registry.

Assuming you do not have have access to another system running Windows 10 1803, you can create the value on your system.

Open a Notepad file, and paste the following in it. Save it as ExcludeProfileDirs with the REG file extension. Once you’ve saved it, right-click the file and select Merge from the context menu. You will need administrative rights to add the value to the registry.

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Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionWinlogon]
"ExcludeProfileDirs"="AppData\Local;AppData\LocalLow;$Recycle.Bin;OneDrive;Work Folders"

Once you’ve added the registry value, restart your system and the error ought to be fixed. You need only do this on systems running Windows 10 1803 as this bug is exclusive to this build. The tricky part of the solution that Microsoft has given is finding a system that is on the latest build but doesn’t have this problem.

We should mention that the registry value is available on any system running 1803. It doesn’t have to be connected to a domain or anything. This makes it easier to find the value though, you can always take the simpler route and create it yourself from the instructions given above.

It’s no longer a surprise that little bugs like this make it to stable builds. The good news is that Microsoft gives you a fix whenever it can. The company doesn’t know what the cause of this bug is just yet which isn’t encouraging but they’re investigating.